Labour, Alienation and the NHL Lockout – Interview with Tyler Shipley

Labour, Alienation and the NHL Lockout – Interview with Tyler Shipley

After a longer-than-intended hiatus, Left Hook is back! We have a series of exciting and thought-provoking original pieces on the way, including a review of the central ideological role played by football in the rise (and fall?) of Toronto mayor Rob Ford, controversial reflections on gender and sex in sport, and a consideration of the racialized dynamics behind the demonization of former MLB superstar Barry Bonds, whose name comes up this winter in Hall of Fame balloting.

Meanwhile, to get back into the swing of things, this week we are sharing a radio interview with Tyler Shipley (editor of Left Hook) which seeks to step back from the specific and superficial aspects of the recent NHL lockout and tries to understand it in the broader context of capitalist class society.  If NHL players are understood simply as rich kids running amok (which, no doubt, many of them are) then it is easy for us to think that we have no stake in who ‘wins’ in the longterm struggle between the players and the owners.  However, if we understand the players in a broader historical context, as workers who remain alienated from the means and products of their labour, and who recieve only a fraction of the wealth that they actually produce, then perhaps there is more reason for us to pay attention to their battle, even if we do not exactly sympathize with it.

The interview aired on CFMU’s “Progressive Voices” on January 4, 2013, and was conducted by Riaz Sayani-Mulji.  It is available here.

 

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